Sunday, November 9, 2008

Window covering solution?

This really should be part of our "Building for Dummies" series as we were appropriately forewarned to consider our window coverings during our design stage (and obviously did not heed the advice). I wanted big open windows without any coverings. The final product is absolutely beautiful and exactly what I had imagined.


As you can imagine, there have been a few practical challenges with my decision:
  1. How do you change (or shower, or do anything else remotely private) in the evening without window treatments?
  2. Most window treatments end up covering the window frame. Our window frames were specifically chosen to match the decor of the house (and we love them). We're not entirely sold on covering them up.
  3. For the treatments that I did like, being the sleek in-the-window-frame option, they don't work with our windows that tilt-and-turn in (as opposed to casement windows that open out). Duh!
I was really pleased when I ran across Apartment Therapy's feature of Trey Russell's apartment in Laguna Beach. His window treatments would work very well for us, although I might just try a slightly more tailored version.

Photos via Allen J Sheiben of the Los Angeles Times

I like that they are flush with the ceiling, still show the window frame, and are fairly simple. In fact, one of the upholsterers here on the island may be able to assist us with something along these lines.

Mr. Big is all for this option. Actually, after having to squat everytime he gets dressed for the last 11 months, he would probably be for any option. Ah, another delimna down...

6 comments:

Corey said...

Why not consider frosting the lower portion of some windows? I've seen this look pretty good as it mostly keeps sightlines open, while providing some privacy.

Window-Pro Talk said...

I am in the window covering industry and design new types of hardware systems for windows.

It would seem a roman shade is the best option but you would prefer the shade to be inside mounted so as not to obscure your window frames.

Are all your windows the swivel type frame?

You can check out our system on our web site here;
http://www.romatrack.com/

Let me know if you have any questions.

Best regards,
Rory McNeil
rory@tech-styles.net

nita said...

Tailored (flat) roman shades work well in a contemporary setting however there are a couple of precautions you need to take particularly when they involve doors. Swing-in type doors present a challenge because any type of shade has to be mounted so that it does not obstruct the opening. Second, many custom roman shades are simply too heavy to use at a door, and constant everyday use will cause wear and tear on the controls eventually causing a problem. You may want to consider compact sheer horizontal blinds with "mock roman" valances--with this option you get privacy and the look and feel of a roman shade.

nita said...

Tailored (flat) roman shades work well in a contemporary setting however there are a couple of precautions you need to take particularly when they involve doors. Swing-in type doors present a challenge because any type of shade has to be mounted so that it does not obstruct the opening. Second, many custom roman shades are simply too heavy to use at a door, and constant everyday use will cause wear and tear on the controls eventually causing a problem. You may want to consider compact sheer horizontal blinds with "mock roman" valances--with this option you get privacy and the look and feel of a roman shade.

Jenny said...

Thank you for the suggestions!

Corey - We've actually been considering the frosting option. I'm just not sure if it will look a bit disjointed. Maybe I'll try to find some pics to investigate more.

Rory - Unfortunately, the windows swing into the house and are flush to the top of the window opening. This means that we can't have them inside mounted. We may just have to do them above the opening. We totally missed this at the planning stage. Ugh. Thanks for the reference to your site though. Looks really good.

Nita - Thanks for the caution on the wear and tear. I'll look into the mock roman option to see how this would look.

Thank you again to everyone for all of your thoughts. Looks like we've got just a bit more to research... :)

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